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World Languages

Language students at Pacifica may study either Spanish or Latin. Through language study, students not only acquire linguistic fluency, but also encounter the language within the context of its respective culture. For example, students of Latin learn to hear, speak, read, and write Latin and also to understand, enjoy, and evaluate contributions to civilization made by Latin-using cultures and institutions. Thus the program creates opportunities for students to experience and acknowledge a variety of patterns of thought and value systems. Through the department’s interdisciplinary approach, students better understand their own languages and cultures, while developing a sense of responsibility and commitment as world citizens.


World Language Courses

Graduation requirement: 2 years

Spanish

Spanish 1

(Year Course)

This college preparatory course introduces basic grammar, speech patterns, sentence structure, and common vocabulary used in daily interchange. By the end of the course, students will be able to engage in introductory/simple conversations, using present tense verbs. Spanish linguistics are introduced and students begin to develop their pronunciation skills correctly. Students will also focus on reading skills, reading multiple mini-novels, and will be given an introduction to the art, culture, and geography of Spanish-speaking countries.

Spanish 2

(Year Course)
Prerequisite: Spanish 1

Spanish 2 places a continuing emphasis on oral comprehension, speaking, pronunciation and vocabulary. This college preparatory course will help students use more complex structures in daily conversations. Students will learn how to use a wide array of verb tenses, beginning with a review of the present tense and moving on to the past tenses, progressive tenses, perfect tenses, and commands. Students will also read and discuss short stories, poems, and mini-novels of prominent Hispanic authors and will be able to write compositions in the target language. Spanish 2 will also expose students to more Spanish-speaking countries and teach the students more culture and geography.

Spanish 3

(Year Course)
Prerequisite: Spanish 2

Spanish 3 is a continuation in the development of students’ knowledge and communicative skills with respect to Spanish. Remaining verb tenses and modes are learned in this year of Spanish language, including perfect tenses, future tense, conditional tense, and the subjunctive mode. Students should be able to write compositions in the target language and carry on meaningful conversations. Reading comprehension will be covered as the students read short novels and excerpts from more advanced literary works of prominent Hispanic authors. Spanish is the primary classroom language, and conventional fluency is the major goal.

AP Spanish Language and Culture (Spanish 4 AP)

(Year Course)
Prerequisite: Spanish 3 with a B or better/Instructor approval

AP Spanish Language and Culture is a preparation course for the AP examination. It engages students in authentic reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities in order to promote fluency in the Spanish language, as well as equip the students with the skills necessary to pass the AP exam. All students are required to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. This course will require meetings outside of the normal class time which are arranged by the teacher.


Latin

Latin 1

(Year Course)

This course begins to develop students’ abilities to understand, analyze, and produce written and spoken Latin. Students become familiar with many stages in the life of Latin, from the early Roman period through the Classical, medieval, and Renaissance periods, right up to the rich traditions of post-Renaissance Latin, including Neo-Latin and Living Latin. Along the way, students learn and analyze some of the political, cultural, social, and linguistic factors that have contributed to the development both of Latin and of the cultures that have used Latin in the last 2500 years. Students build fluency in Latin by way of a natural, immersive method, engaging in a variety of oral and text-based activities that build students’ mastery of vocabulary, grammar, idiom, reading strategies, and discursive conventions. In addition to reading from the textbook, should read selections from medieval and post-medieval works, especially poems, songs, and tales.

Latin 2

(Year Course)
Prerequisite: Latin 1

This course continues to develop students’ abilities to understand, analyze, and produce written and spoken Latin. Students become familiar with many stages in the life of Latin, from the early Roman period through the Classical, medieval, and Renaissance periods, right up to the rich traditions of post-Renaissance Latin, including Neo-Latin and Living Latin. Along the way, students learn and analyze some of the political, cultural, social, and linguistic factors that have contributed to the development both of Latin and of the cultures that have used Latin in the last 2500 years. Students continue build fluency in Latin by way of a natural, immersive method, engaging in a variety of oral and text-based activities that build students’ mastery of vocabulary, grammar, idiom, reading strategies, and discursive conventions. Readings include textbook stories, selections from the Vulgate, as well as—keeping in mind that the vast majority of extant Latin texts are post-Roman—selections from medieval and post-medieval works, especially poems, songs, and tales. In addition to writing and conversing, critically and reflectively, in Latin and in English, about the above texts and topics, students begin to make their own creative contributions to the store of Latin writing, composing dialogues, stories, letters, and other forms.

Latin 3

(Year Course)
Prerequisite: Latin 2

This intermediate course continues to develop students’ abilities to understand, analyze, and produce written and spoken Latin. Students increase their familiarity with the many stages in the life of Latin, from the early Roman period through the Classical, medieval, and Renaissance periods, right up to the rich traditions of post-Renaissance Latin, including Neo-Latin and Living Latin. Along the way, students learn and analyze some of the political, cultural, social, and linguistic factors that have contributed to the development both of Latin and of the cultures that have used Latin in the last 2500 years. Students continue to build fluency in Latin by way of a natural, immersive method, engaging in a variety of oral and text-based activities that build students’ mastery of vocabulary, grammar, idiom, reading strategies, and discursive conventions. Readings include textbook stories, as well as—keeping in mind that the vast majority of extant Latin texts are post-Roman—selections from the medieval Scholastics, medieval Gesta and songs, Renaissance fables, and post-Renaissance theological, scientific, and poetic works. In addition to writing and conversing, critically and reflectively, in Latin and in English, about the above texts and topics, students make their own creative contributions to the store of Latin writing, composing dialogues, stories, letters, and other forms.